Support all your favorite nonprofits with a single donation.

Donate safely, anonymously & monthly, in any amount. It's a smarter way to give online. Learn more
The Hunger Project
New York, NY
givvers: wellbranch, jason + 3 others

The Hunger Project is a global, non-profit, strategic organization committed to the sustainable end of world hunger. We work in 11 countries in Africa, South Asia and Latin America to develop effective, bottom-up strategies to end hunger and poverty.

The Hunger Project is a 501(c)3 organization.

Latest News

Aug 25, 2014

This report highlights our work to end hunger in 14,000 communities throughout Africa, South Asia and Latin America as well as our global advocacy efforts in 22 countries. We sustained and grew our vibrant movement of people who know the end of chronic hunger and abject poverty is possible — and that each of us can do something to make it happen.

2013 Annual Report

Download the full 2013 Annual Report (11.86 MB).

In 2013, our global movement to end hunger took a major leap forward. The world community worked to set a post-2015 development agenda to follow the Millennium Development Goals. We saw the emergence of bold, zero-based goals and international alignment to end hunger and poverty on our planet once and for all.

Now, more than 35 years after The Hunger Project launched with the proclamation that the end of hunger was a possibility, experts agree it is an achievable goal by the year 2030. We celebrate this exciting news. Yet, we recognize business as usual will not get us there. We still need a paradigm shift in how the world approaches development.

This report highlights our work to end hunger in 14,000 communities throughout Africa, South Asia and Latin America as well as our global advocacy efforts in 22 countries. We sustained and grew our vibrant movement of people who know the end of chronic hunger and abject poverty is possible — and that each of us can do something to make it happen.

Download the full report (11.86 MB).
 

Download The Hunger Project At-A-Glance Infographic.

Download The Hunger Project's Epicenter Strategy in 2013 Infographic.

Download The Hunger Project's Unleashing a Self-Reliant Bangladesh in 2013 Infographic.

Aug 20, 2014

August 20, 2014
Human Development Report 2014

Every society is confronted with varying degrees of risks and instability, however, not all communities are affected the same way; nor does every group recover with ease after a state of emergency. The 2014 report outlines the structural and life cycle vulnerabilities that influence human development and impede sustainable progress, while presenting different ways to strengthen resilience against future shocks. 

The latest Human Development Report- Sustaining Human Progress: Reducing Vulnerabilities and Building Resilience- by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) sheds light on the broad spectrum of global problems threatening to undercut existing human development efforts and achievements.

read more

Aug 07, 2014

It has been a very exciting summer at The Hunger Project-Burkina Faso. Boulkon Epicenter welcomed the Head of the Health and Nutrition Department of UNICEF and a specialist in community health on June 6. Over the course of their visit they met with animators and health program leaders. 

THP-Burkina Welcomes Partnerships with UNICEF’s Head of Health and Nutrition and Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security

It has been a very exciting summer at The Hunger Project-Burkina Faso. Boulkon Epicenter welcomed the Head of the Health and Nutrition Department of UNICEF and a specialist in community health on June 6. Over the course of their visit they met with animators and health program leaders. Some of the programs they were introduced to included: the nutrition education program, the child weighing and monitoring program and the testing of malnourished children program. The head of Boulkon’s health center was also present and bore witness to The Hunger Project-Burkina’s contributions to improving health and nutrition in the area.

The UNICEF delegates expressed their appreciation for the work being done by The Hunger Project. The head of the delegation made the following remark about their visit:

“The Hunger Project’s actions follow a coherent logic regarding the fight against malnutrition. The nursery school, where children are educated from a young age; the food bank; the promotion of income-generating activities through the rural bank; and the nutrition education all work together to end child malnutrition.”

The delegates assured The Hunger Project-Burkina that they are eager to collaborate on community-oriented projects that continue to advance health and nutrition.

Later in the month, The Hunger Project-Burkina signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Ministry of Agriculture & Food Security. The agreement aims to accelerate progress towards accomplishing the goals under the Accelerated Growth and Sustainable Development Strategy by the Burkinabe government. It agrees to establish a partnership and collaboration, such that The Hunger Project-Burkina benefits from the technical capacities of the Ministry and its oversight in agricultural activities.

Learn More

Aug 05, 2014

The National Agency of Eco-Villages (ANEV) and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency signed an agreement with the Coki Epicenter Rural Bank to implement the Environmental Protection and Financial Sustainability Program. The program aims to promote the use of biodigesters that convert waste into renewable energy. 

THP-Senegal Embraces “Green Microfinance”

The National Agency of Eco-Villages (ANEV) and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency signed an agreement with the Coki Epicenter Rural Bank to implement the Environmental Protection and Financial Sustainability Program. The program aims to promote the use of biodigesters that convert waste into renewable energy.

The agreement establishes the epicenter’s Rural Bank as an intermediary between ANEV and individual microfinance partners. This structure allows partners to reimburse the bank directly, and enables the bank to relend money to new partners interested in constructing biogas systems.

By combusting methane produced from the decomposition of manure without oxygen, biodigesters help reduce methane emissions and prevent it from being released into the atmosphere. Instead, it can be used as gas for cooking, heating and lighting. After the gas is released, the remaining waste product is mixed with straw to create rich compost that can be sold as a natural fertilizer for gardeners. Biodigesters also help women in rural settings have access to cooking fuel, and reduce their expenses towards butane gas, firewood or charcoal

Jul 31, 2014

Learn more about Rukia Tiga's journey to better access to water, sanitation and hygiene for her children's school.

A Better Future for our Children

Wurib is located 140 km from Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia. Wurib Epicenter was mobilized and entered its first phase of development in August 2009. It has since reached its second and third phases of sustainability in 2010 and 2011, respectively.

Community members like Rukia Tiga have played an important role in prioritizing education and school safety in Wurib. Rukia is 27 years old. Her seven children attend Mikaelo, the only primary school available to them. Like most mothers, she wants her children to flourish in a safe learning environment. However, their school’s lack of resources posed a threat to many of the children’s health.

“Mikaelo was not a suitable place for children. The classroom walls were made of mud. The floors were dusty. Children also suffered from not having a toilet.” 

According to Rukia, in the absence of toilets, open areas and playgrounds doubled as a bathroom—making contagious diseases all too commonplace. These problems were compounded by the fact that the school had no access to clean water. All students were expected to carry water with them to school to help clean it.

Alongside the district government and other NGO’s, including The Hunger Project-Ethiopia, Wurib Epicenter has invested a significant amount of resources aimed at improving the community’s living conditions and access to education. Mikaelo now has a toilet for girls and boys and clean water.

Rukia is optimistic about the work being done to address the basic needs of water, sanitation and hygiene in Wurib. She claims the support of organizations like The Hunger Project make progress achievable.

 

Learn More

Jul 29, 2014

Read about Tasly's journey as a community leader and a catalyst for change among women in her village.

Energetic and Inspired Women Forming a Hunger Free Society

Tasly was born in 1976 in the Baroidanga village of Satgambug Union in Bangladesh. Despite her limited means, she was very successful in school and received a Higher Secondary Certificate (high school). She dreamed of completing higher education, but was soon married off by her family. Her educational aspirations were no longer in her control. During her second year of marriage, she gave birth to a baby girl. Unable to pay the dowry being asked of her, Tasly returned to her father’s house with great sorrow. She began giving private tutoring lessons as a way to support her new life with her daughter. 

In 2008, The Hunger Project-Bangladesh arranged an Animator Training on microfinance near Tasly’s village. After attending the training, she and 25 other women formed a cooperative society, named “Dahuk Women Savings Samity,” to keep track of their individual savings. During weekly meetings, they discussed social and community issues like early marriage, dowry, antenatal care, postnatal care and compulsory primary education. Over time, their cooperative’s savings has increased to 100,000 taka (US $1,285). With these savings, they offer loans to other village women for different kinds of income-generating activities like fishing, tailoring, goat and cow farming. Each cooperative member averages an income of 2,000 taka (US $25) per month.

Tasly has embraced her role as an active leader in her community. In 2012, Tasly and 18 other women attended the Women Leader Foundation Course, a training arranged by The Hunger Project-Bangladesh. After completing the course, Tasly attended monthly follow-up meetings arranged by The Hunger Project to bring new social development initiatives to her village. These initiatives ranged from sanitation practices, planting trees, birth registration, enrolling  children in school, and prevention of early marriage. In that same year, a Women’s Network was formed in the union of Satgumbuj and Tasly was elected as the general secretary of the committee. She was also elected as a member of Patorpara Primary School’s managing committee and Satgumbuj Union Parishad’s committee of educational affairs. Under Tasly’s leadership, a women’s organization was formed in each ward.

Currently, Tasly works for a local NGO named Gonobidaloy. Her journey is a prime example of the importance of economically empowering women and letting them play a central role in shaping their community.

Learn More

Jul 25, 2014

“More women are looking to organize a group in order to obtain credit to finance and strengthen their business activities. We sincerely hope that this goes on.” Hear about one woman's journey to empowerment through Hunger Project programs.

Empowering Women to Organize and Reach Their Business Goals

Ibrahim Mariama is a resident of Daringa and a vibrant member of The Hunger Project’s Microfinance Program in Benin. As a wife and mother of three children, she sells rice paste to support her family.

As an active member of The Hunger Project’s Microfinance group, she walks us through her impressions and journey.

"Before my loan with the The Hunger Project, I was on a strict repayment installment plan. As soon I sold food, I had to immediately pay back my loan. It was an unprofitable cycle and kept me from meeting my family’s daily needs.

One day, I visited the epicenter to learn about The Hunger Project’s program. Following a training, I was eligible for a $45 loan. This allowed me to consistently have more operating capital. I can now order a bag of rice and five liters of palm oil, at least. On three days’ take, I reinvest two of them and consider the third day’s take my income. This structure allows me to provide food for my children, contribute to my community, and help my husband. Today I feel he respects me more and trusts me to have a say on important decisions about the future of our children.”

Ibrahim also believes the loan has helped strengthen her relationships with other women in her group. They often discuss different strategies they can implement to repay their loans on time:

“In order to always repay our loan on the due date, we created a cashbox where we contribute a fixed amount of $8 every month during meetings. This removes a lot of the pressure.”

In addition to her own personal growth, Ibrahim sees how her group’s dynamics has influenced and motivated other women. She feels hopeful about her future and the ongoing development in her community.

"More women are looking to organize a group in order to obtain credit to finance and strengthen their business activities. We sincerely hope that this goes on.”

Learn More

Jul 23, 2014

"New agricultural practices have enabled our community to increase agricultural production and improve our food security." Read one man's experience with The Hunger Project's agricultural programs.

What I've learned from using organic manure

I am Sankara Saidou. I am fifty-two years old and the father of twelve children. The village of Singdin, located three kilometers from Boulkon Epicenter in Burkina, is my home. I raise livestock (goats, sheep, chickens and oxen) and farm for a living.

My involvement with the epicenter began in 2009. It is here where I received training in organic manure production. I have since put this knowledge into practice and can speak to the benefits it has had on my sorghum (a type of grain) field:

  • The plants are more resistant to droughts and the physical qualities of the soil have improved.
  • The farming operations were also very easy, and the physiological condition of the plants has been better.
  • I have noticed that my field with organic manure yields twice the amount than my other field without organic manure.
  • The excess fodder allows me to feed my animals, but also use a portion of it for composting.I have been able to harvest twice the amount of cereal crops with the use of organic manure. Making the months of July, August, and September easier.


I thank The Hunger Project for introducing us to new agricultural practices. These practices have enabled our community to increase agricultural production and improve our own food security.

Learn More